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Sunday, July 19, 2020 | History

2 edition of Psychological factors in post operative adjustment to stoma surgery. found in the catalog.

Psychological factors in post operative adjustment to stoma surgery.

Craig A. White

Psychological factors in post operative adjustment to stoma surgery.

by Craig A. White

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  • 10 Currently reading

Published by University of Manchester in Manchester .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (Clin.Psy.D.), - University of Manchester, Faculty of Medicine.

ContributionsUniversity of Manchester. Faculty of Medicine.
The Physical Object
Pagination137p.
Number of Pages137
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16576164M

Sixteen patients with a moderate or severe anxiety and/or depression one year after stoma surgery were compared with 52 patients who had made a good psychiatric adjustment. Factors that were associated with an increased risk of psychiatric morbidity included a previous psychiatric history, postoperative physical symptoms and complications Cited by: Research has shown that some psychological factors related to ostomy adjustment are not disclosed by patients unless asked by the nurse (White, ). In the immediate postoperative period, the patient’s ability to learn ostomy care is complicated by the need to accept and integrate the fact that the ostomy is present (Sirota, a, b).

  The transition from hospital to home is an important milestone for any patient: having progressed through surgery and early postoperative care, they have now achieved discharge status. Stoma surgery can adversely affect patients’ body image, and community nurses need to help such patients adjust to these by: Previous studies of health-related quality of life [4, 5, 6,7] in people receiving stoma-forming surgery and one meta-synthesis [52] have found that stoma-forming surgery has a dramatic impact on post-operative adjustment in terms of poor self-image and individuals feeling out of control of their bodies and their lives.

Self-care agency refers to the acquired ability to perform self-care, and is influenced by willingness, knowledge, and skills. Piwonka viewed stoma self-care as the single most important factor predicting positive psychological adjustment to stoma implantation. Knowledge, the foundation of decision-making, is an important influencer of by: Psychosocial adjustment among patients with ostomy: a survey in stoma clinics, Nepal Sital Gautam,1 Surya Koirala,2 Anju Poudel,1 Dipak Paudel,3 1Department of Nursing, Nepal Medical College, 2Department of Nursing, Institute of Medicine, Tribhuvan University, Nursing Campus Maharajgunj, 3Department of Medicine, People’s Medical College, Kathmandu, Nepal Author: Sital Gautam, Surya Koirala, Anju Poudel, Dipak Paudel.


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Psychological factors in post operative adjustment to stoma surgery by Craig A. White Download PDF EPUB FB2

Abstract. Around one-quarter of stoma patients experience clinically significant psychological symptoms post-operatively. Psychological disorders are often not detected by those involved with the care of stoma patients. Past psychiatric history, dissatisfaction with preoperative preparation for surgery, postoperative physical symptomatology and Cited by: Psychological factors in postoperative adjustment to stoma surgery.

White CA(1), Hunt JC. Author information: (1)University of Manchester. Around one-quarter of stoma patients experience clinically significant psychological symptoms post-operatively. Psychological disorders are often not detected by those involved with the care of stoma by: Psychological disorders are often not detected by those involved with the care of stoma patients.

Past psychiatric history, dissatisfaction with preoperative preparation for surgery, postoperative physical symptomatology and the presence of negative stoma-related thoughts/beliefs have all been shown to be significantly associated with psychological morbidity after surgery.

Cognitions about physical integrity, impact on life and control are important in understanding adjustment to stoma surgery. These could be targeted for modification using cognitive therapy to reduce psychological distress among this patient by: Psychological disorders are often not detected by those involved with the care of stoma patients.

Past psychiatric history, dissatisfaction with preoperative preparation for surgery, postoperative physical symptomatology and the presence of negative stoma-related thoughts/beliefs have all been shown to be significantly associated with Author: C.

White and J. Hunt. White CA, Hunt JC () Psychological factors in postoperative adjustment to stoma surgery. Ann R Coll Surg Engl 79(1): 3–7 Google Scholar; Williams J () Psychological issues in stoma care.

In: Porrett T, McGrath A, eds. Stoma Care. Blackwell, Oxford: –68 Google ScholarAuthor: Anna Wallace.

Psychosocial adaptation to stoma surgery: A review into the psychosocial adjustment of patients after stoma surgery has intensified as well, giving us indications for quality of life. The Psychological and Social Impact of Stoma Surgery Background to the Problem This project will define what it is like to live with a stoma.

A stoma is an artificial opening in the bowel, created by a surgeon to divert the flow of faeces and/or urine. TheFile Size: 58KB. Evidence suggests that patients undergoing stoma-formation surgery can experience psychological difficulties that will have a detrimental effect on the stoma patient's (i.e.

the ostomate's) quality of life over time. In this literature review, three main categories emerged from the data: physical adaptation, social adaptation, Cited by: 4. Psychological adaptation to alteration of body image among stoma patients: A descriptive study Conducting case–control studies may be necessary to gain further insight on the risk factors of poor psychological adaptation to body image among stoma patients.

Psychological factors in postoperative adjustment to stoma surgery. Ann R Coll Cited by: 7. The severity of the illness prior to surgery as measured by symptoms did not predict psychological problems but both physical symptoms and stoma complications following the operation were associated.

It is possible therefore that these two factors play a considerable role in postoperative psychiatric by: Emotional adjustment to the stoma can be facilitated by this information and help improve the confidence of the patient to independently manage their stoma (Farrell & Dempsey ).

This education can also have a positive effect on the person’s anxiety levels by teaching them how to independently care for their stoma while they are in a supportive environment.

During the last decade strong improvements have been made in the medical care of patients with a digestive tract stoma, particularly with regard to nursing skills and to the quality of collecting material for faecal products.

Scientific investigation into the psychosocial adjustment of patients after stoma surgery has intensified as well, giving us indications for quality of by: Psychological Adjustment to Ostomy Surgery Two studies of factors that influence outcome are also re­ volved with the care of the stoma every day for the rest of their lives.

A stoma. 5, 11,20 Therefor adjustment to an ostomy can be defined as the reaction to the psychological, social and sexual impact of it as it is perceived from the patient. 20,22 Multiple factors such as. This study examined psychological factors which contribute to recovery from outpatient ambulatory surgery.

The Ss were 50 women who were scheduled to have elective laparoscopic pre-operative factors included ratings of mood, fear of surgery, outcome expectancies, state-trait anxiety and emotional by: The influence of preoperative psychological factors on weight loss after bariatric surgery: A preliminary report.

Aim of this study was to investigate relationship between preoperative psychological factors and % total weight loss after gastric bypass. White CA, Hunt JC () Psychological factors in postoperative adjustment to stoma surgery. Ann R Coll Surg Eng –7 Google Scholar Williams NS, Johnston D () The quality of life after rectal excision for low rectal by: 1.

White CA, Hunt JC () Psychological factors in postoperative adjustment to stoma surgery. Ann R Coll Surg Engl 79(1): 3–7 Google Scholar; White CA, Unwin JC () Post-operative adjustment to surgery resulting in the formation of a stoma: the importance of stoma-related cognitions.

Br J Health Psychol 3(1): 85–93 Crossref, Google ScholarCited by: 2. psychological aspects of patients with intestinal stoma. The Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO) periodicals portal and the following databases, considered important in the context of health and available online, were used to search for primary studies: American Psychological Association (PsycINFO), National LibraryCited by: 9.

An intestinal stoma is a profound alteration in body function that a patient must manage day to day over significant periods of time, often permanently. Although the creation of a stoma takes place in a tertiary care surgical context, long-term management is very often a primary care issue and most GPs and community-based nurses are familiar with patients with by: 5.Postoperative risks may be higher and adjustment more difficult if delayed surgery means the patient is more critically ill at the time of surgery, 13 and avoiding a stoma.

Stoma for non-cancer patients occur primarily due to inflammatory bowel disease including: ulcerative colitis and crohn's disease.

Our results are in line with other studies (3, 16, 20). It is widely established that stoma patients encountered with a variety of psychosocial, emotional, sexual, and social problems (15, 21–23).Cited by: 3.